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Auf den Hund gekommen

Tearaway Thomas logo

Was ein richtiges Plattform-Game ist, das braucht ein richtiges Knuddelmonster als Helden, stimmt's? Was also dem Konsolen-Igel "Sonic" recht war, war "Zool" billig – und ist auch hier nicht teuer...

Tearaway Thomas Ein interessanter Nebenaspekt dieser Entwicklung ist die Wandlung vom originalen Turbo-Igel über die Ninja-Ameise zum Flug-Hund. Er braucht dafür zwar das passende Extra, und besonders elegant flattert er auch nicht gerade dahin, aber er flattert. Ansonsten kann der wandelnden Flohzirkus sehr schnell laufen, wilde Putzelbäume schlagen und sich an Seilen etc. entlanghangeln. Waffen sind standesgemäß verpönt, also bekämpft man die feindlichen Teddybären, Pinguine etc. halt durch standesgemäßes Draufhüpfen.

All das dient letzlich dem Zweck, die 50 auf fünf Welten verteilten Level unter Zeitdruck von störenden Diamanten zu befreien, um danach hocherhobenen Hauptes den Levelausgang zu durchschreiten. Das heißt, zunächst muß man ihn finden, so wie hier überhaupt alles etwas komplizierter ist, als es zuerst den Anschein hat. Beispielsweise herrscht in der Ausgangswelt die reinste Diamanten-Schwemme, während die Klunker später immer rarer werden. Doch mit etwas Glück stößt man in den ebenso riesigen wie raffiniert (aber fair) konstruierten Leveln auf geheime Edelstein-Lager, Abkürzungen oder Stellen, an denen es im wahrsten Sinn des Wortes Diamanten regnet. Die prima animierte Grafik sieht gut aus, scrollt tadellos und ist vor allem rasend Schnell. Der Sound hat teilweise Ohrwurmqualität, und die Steuerung arbeitet absolut präzise – die Newcomer von Soundware haben hier also ein überzeugendes Debut abgeliefert, dem es nur ein wenig an Eigenständigkeit mangelt. (mm)

Amiga Joker, December 1992, p.74

TEARAWAY THOMAS
(SOUNDWARE)
JUMP & FUN
74%
"TIERISCH"
Amiga Joker
GRAFIK
ANIMATION
MUSIK
SOUND-FX
HANDHABUNG
DAUERSPAß
70%
79%
75%
71%
72%
75%
FÜR GEÜBTE
PREIS DM 74,-
SPEICHERBEDARF
DISKS/ZWEITFLOPPY
HD-INSTALLATION
SPEICHERBAR
DEUTSCH
512 KB
1/NEIN
NEIN
HIGHSCORES
ANLEITUNG


Tearaway Thomas logo

Faster than a speeding pensioner, able to leap tall curbs in a single stride, Dan Slingsby dons his red lurex catsuit to review one of the fastest platform games ever to appear on the Amiga.

Tearaway Thomas MONKEY BUSINESS
Easily carrying off the award for worst title of the year is this new offering from newly-formed Global Software. Tearaway Thomas is being touted as the fastest-moving game on the Amiga and a potential Sonic beater, but you'd never guess from the title – it sounds more like a children's bed time story than a state-of-the-art home computer game. Whoever cam up with such an appalling name should be taken out and shot, as they obviously have no idea how to market a game at all This is further evidenced by the gaudy and tasteless packaging the game comes in, which looks like it was put together by a chimpanzee and a set of crayons.

This is all a great pity, as the actual game itself is really rather good. So good, in fact, that I've been unable to stop playing it for the last couple of weeks. It's a platform game, pure and simple, with the emphasis on speed and reflexes. The graphics are cute and simple, the music irritatingly hummable, and the action non-stop. Forget the awful plot – some nonsense about a quest to find out who you are – and jump straight in to a 50-level romp, complete with numerous nasties, bonus levels, special stages, hidden rooms and everything else you'd expect to find in a top notch platformer.

In all there are five worlds to complete, with each one split up into 10 levels. Each world has a particular theme. For instance, the first world is set in woodlands and is populated by marauding bears and big fat birds. Even a tweety-bird lookalike makes an appearance on one stage. Other worlds include a polar region, with polar bears kitted out in bobble hats, a horror world, a world made up of toys and the final future zone, with robotic nasties to take care of. The aim of each stage is to collect a set number of gems with a certain time limit. If you fail to pick up enough gems in time, you automatically lose one of the three lives you start the game with.

NASTIES ON STUN
Although there are plenty of nasties roaming each level, their only function is to stun you and thus lose you valuable time. Each encounter will cost you approximately one second as Thomas falls to the ground with stars spinning around his head. Once back on his feet, it's back to collecting the requisite number of gems. When this is achieved, an exit will open through which you have to escape before the time limit runs out. It's nice to see a platform game which doesn't rely on energy levels and which put s the emphasis on a race against the clock. This is much more fun and really makes for non-stop action as you frantically search for the gems.

Tearaway Thomas Just when you think you've explored every possible nook and cranny, and that last gem is nowhere insight, you'll stumble upon a secret room or cave which will be stuffed with extra gems or find a hidden transporter which will warp you to another stage packed full of goodies. At times, things get incredibly manic, but never frustrating. Thomas is able to climb ropes, cause mini-earthquakes by jumping up and down in certain spots, and can generally dash around each level with amazing speed. I certainly haven't played a platform game on the Amiga which is as fast-paced as this one!

CLOBBERIN' TIME
Of course, no game is perfect, and Tearaway Thomas is not without fault. Although the nasties can stun you into submission, there's very little you can do to them other than jump on their bonces for some extra points. This is all very well, but it would have been nice to have given them a taste of their own medicine, or even to have been able to club them off the screen all together. As it is, they merrily carry on their way, no matter how many times you crack them on the head. There's also a distinct lack of variety in the nasties. In the early stages there are only one or two different enemy sprites patrolling each level and, although things improve later on, it's a bit boring. A little more planning and originality would have helped things tremendously.

Considering this is David Henney and Nick Frampton's first Amiga game, they've certainly turned in a cracking job. The scrolling is silky smooth, the graphics palette suitably gaudy, and the speed of the main sprite amazingly quick. At times, as Thomas tumbles about the screen, it's hard to keep up with the pace of the action. Definitely a superior platformer and well worth the price.

CU Amiga, January 1993, p.53

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Out now
Platform
Head-on tech.
Joystick
1
1
No
512k

 

GLOBAL SOFTWARE £25.99
Hijinks in a superfast game against the clock.
GRAPHICS
SOUND
LASTABILITY
PLAYABILITY
82%
79%
83%
86%
OVERALL 84%