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Quik  The Thunder Rabbit logo

What has big floppy ears, is covered in fur and has particularly good eyesight? Not Tony Dillon, that's for sure. Ever the talkative type, we thought we'd let him 'rabbit' on about Titus' latest platform romp.

Quik  The Thunder Rabbit Titus are a software house who have been incredibly quiet for the last two years. Now, they've come back with a game that really is a lot of fun.

There isn't really a lot of a plot, in Quik the Thunder Rabbit but with a game as odd as this one, you don't really need much of a storyline. Essentially, you are a rabbit with fairly unusual habits. One who eats carrots and drinks water like there is no tomorrow, but has a bit of a personality problem, that has resulted in most, if not all of the other woodland creatures to turn against you and want to kill you. All you want to do is get from one side of your world to the other, and if that means you have to fight back and take on everything that moves, then so it has to be.

SPINNING WHEEL
Quik  The Thunder Rabbit Unlike most platform games that have come out in the last couple of years, you don't damage enemy characters by jumping on their heads. Instead, a quick touch of the fire button turns you into a rolling ball of fur, with which you can launch yourself Sonic-Like against the opposition, smashing them to pieces in the meantime. There is no limit on the number of times you can spin around the screen like a pinball, but doing it does use up your food and water reserves, so you always have to be on the lookout for a top up.

ENEMY TACTICS
Quik  The Thunder Rabbit The enemy sprites are as varied as you could want them to be. From snakes with hypnotic vision that fixes you to the spot to caterpillars with electrified spikes on their back all the way to foxes that unicycle on large boulders, before kicking them towards you. A lot of care and attention has been paid to the enemy, and it really has paid off. There are a whole string of different tactics you can apply to taking on the enemy such as rebounding off walls, slamming them off ledges and it really adds to the game.

As does the variety of backdrops and tasks for each stage. On some levels all you need to do is find the exit, which is usually on the extreme right of the level. On others you need to find a clock before you can move ahead, which is usually hidden on another sublevel, the door to which is hidden away somewhere on the level. Each level itself is huge, and laid out in the form of a very complicated maze, so just finding your way around is a real challenge. Thankfully there are arrows and sign reading 'This Way' dotted around the screen to help you on your way, although sometimes they'll just lead to a dead end, in which case you'll be confronted with a sign reading 'Joke'. Ahh, that French humour.

STRANGE BUT GOOD
Visually the game is wonderful. There is a real character and charm that makes it stand out quite a bit. Take the main sprite, for example. At first glance, it doesn't so much look like a rabbit as a small child in a rabbit costume. His face is very well animated, breaking out into a smile whenever he collects everything, and the way his ears bounce around when he jumps is just adorable.

Quik the Thunder Rabbit. It has an odd name. It's a little odd to play. But then, odd is interesting!

CU Amiga, August 1994, p.77

TITUS 16.99
A500
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TITUS THE OLD FORGE, CALEDONIAN ROAD, LONDON N1. TEL: 071 700 2220
 
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OUT NOW
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3
1
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1Mb

 
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83%
78%
79%
81%
Quik is a much better than average game, and a lot of fun.
OVERALL: 80%